Q?

Tell me about yourself??

A.

Despite how this open-ended question sounds, it is not literally an invitation to delve into an existential examination of your life before your interviewers. Especially not because this is a job interview question! A good answer should focus on the fact that this is an elevator pitch opportunity and needs rehearsing. Be ready to wrap up your answer in 1 minute and focus on the positive summary of your skills, professional accomplishments, and personal experience that casts you in the most appealing light for the job. Talk about your promotions, highlight your successes and quantify your achievements. One of the worst things you can do is drone on without realizing you are boring the other person or answering with details they aren’t interested in, so pay attention to non-verbal cues as you talk and be ready to adjust mid-way through if you need to.

Q?

What are your career goals and short term golas?

A.

A short term goal is a goal that you set for yourself that can be accomplished within one year.. described as below.. Have to increase speed and accuracy. Finish projects in a timely manner. Have to manage time better. Keep work place tidy and clean. Have a good attitude. Learn new skills. Try to cut costs.
Career goals commonly fall into the categories of enhancing skills in communication, leadership, teamwork and technology. Improve Communication Skills. Exemplary employees are adept at giving and receiving information. ... Enhance Leadership Ability. ... Gain Teamwork Experience. ... Learn New Technology.

Q?

Why do you want to join our company?

A.

Interviewers often ask this question as a way to determine whether or not you took time to research the company and to learn why you see yourself as a good fit. The best way to prepare for this question is to do your homework and learn about the products, services, mission, history and culture of this workplace. In your answer, mention the aspects of the company that appeal to you and align with your career goals. Explain why you’re looking for these things in an employer. Example: “The company’s mission to help college grads pay off their student loan debt speaks to me. I’ve been in that situation, and I’d love the opportunity to work with a company that’s making a difference. Finding a company with a positive work environment and values that align with my own has remained a priority throughout my job search, and this company ranks at the top of the list.”

Q?

Why should we hire you?

A.

If you chose to leave on your own terms, stay positive and focus on what you wanted to gain from the decision, rather than bad-mouthing or focusing on negatives you wanted to avoid. And if you were fired or laid off, be upfront and clear. You’re not going to make employers want to hire you by being vague or trying to hide something. If you got fired, show what you’ve learned from the experience, and what you’ve done to make sure this doesn’t happen again. That’s how to spin it into a positive. Do: Be clear and direct and address the question head-on If you were fired, own up to it and share what you’ve done to make sure this never happens again If you chose to resign, focus on the positive things you hoped to gain by moving to the next opportunity, rather than badmouthing or talking about the negatives in your last role

Q?

What is your salary range expectation?

A.

If you’ve delayed answering the question and the interviewer asks you again, it’s time to respond. Avoid giving a specific number. Instead, you can provide a range. Cite your research and frame the conversation as being about what is fair rather than what you want. Here are some examples of how to answer: For the less experienced candidate: “I understand from my research and experience that low 6000s to mid-10000s is the competitive range for this role in this industry and city.” “In this environment and in this location, my research indicates that mid-15000s to low-25000s is a reasonable range.” For the more experienced candidate: “Based on my experience in this field and my research on the current market, I understand that mid 70 to low 90s is a competitive range.” Leave it there. Wait to negotiate further until you have a formal job offer in hand.

Q?

What are your greatest strengths?

A.

This question gives you an opportunity to talk about both your technical and soft skills. When an interviewer asks you to describe your strengths, share qualities and personal attributes and then relate them back to the role for which you’re interviewing. Example: ”I’m a natural problem-solver. I find it rewarding to dig deep and uncover solutions to challenges—it’s like solving a puzzle. It’s something I’ve always excelled at, and something I enjoy. Much of product development is about finding innovative solutions to challenging issues, which is what drew me to this career path in the first place.”

Q?

What are your greatest weaknesses?

A.

It can feel awkward to discuss your weaknesses in an environment where you’re expected to focus on your accomplishments. However, when answered correctly, sharing your weaknesses can show that you are self-aware and want to continuously get better at your job—traits that are extremely attractive to many employers. Remember to start with the weakness and then discuss the measures you’ve taken to improve. This way, you’re finishing your answer on a positive note. Example: ”I sometimes have trouble saying “no” and end up overwhelmed by my workload. Earlier in my career, I would take on so many projects that I’d work evenings and weekends. It was stressful. I realized this was counterproductive, so I started using workload management tools and setting better expectations for myself and my teammates.”